Videos

This Video Is A #FAIL

I’m a failure. This video is proof.

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If you have any questions you’d like me to answer in video, leave a comment or drop me an email at jeynagrace[at]gmail[dot]com! Your question can be completely random—should pineapples be on pizza? Well, ask away!

Writing Journey

Why You Should Be A Failure

Failing is scary. And we’re all afraid of failure. We’re afraid of failing in our exams, in our relationships, in our businesses, and in our life. We are so afraid of failure that we find excuses not to encounter it, if we can. And for some, that would mean allowing this fear to hold them back from pursuing their dreams.

Are you afraid of failure? Is the fear of failure robbing you of your future? Today, I want you to be a failure. I want you to embrace it, welcome it, and face it. I want you to own up to your failures. Because failing is probably one of the best things you can ever do in your life.

Bold statement—I know. Here’s why.

#1 Being A Failure Elevates Your Skill

Wait, doesn’t failure reinforce your inabilities? Doesn’t it broadcast your lack of skill to the world? How can failing make you better?

I believe that every failure is an opportunity to learn from your mistakes. So yes, it showcases your weaknesses. But the more you fail, the more chances you have to eliminate the causes of your past failures. Each fail brings to light your shortcomings, allowing you to better yourself in those areas. If you’re afraid to fail, you will never be able to answer the how, when, why, and where.

So, should you be afraid of failure? You can be—facing your weaknesses is no easy task—but start seeing failure as an opportunity to grow in your craft. Don’t fear it, embrace it!

#2 Being A Failure Strengthens Your Passion

If you fail one too many times, you are at risk of giving up. You’ll start to question your passion and the reason behind your relentless pursuit. Failure will tempt you to throw in the towel… or will it?

Failure does indeed challenge the purpose of your passion. It will inevitably question your dreams. But failure also gives you the chance to reevaluate your reason. If you don’t have a strong reason behind your pursuits, failure is the perfect time to find that reason. It allows you to strengthen your intentions, helping you to keep failing until you succeed.

So, should you be afraid of failure? Yes—you’ll have to answer questions that will determine your future—but allow failure to build a sturdy foundation for your dreams and goals. Don’t fear it, welcome it!

#3 Being A Failure Builds Your Character

Nobody feels good when they fail. Failure makes us feel incompetent, worthless, and insignificant. Failure presents a package of negative emotions that will drag us down a lonely and hopeless road. However, failure is one of the few places where we can rise from the ashes.

Determination and drive don’t come from sunshine and rainbows. What kind of a person would you be if your life was a storm-free ocean? Calm seas with no turmoil—you’ll be the same person you’ve always been, safe within the borders of your boat. But, if the seas were rough—if you were tossed into the raging waters—you would’ve been forced to swim. And if you successfully pulled yourself out, saving yourself from the depths of the sea, you won’t be the same person as you were before. You now have a strength that came from the experience. You have become a fighter.

Those who fail and fail often are not afraid of the ocean. They once were, but the waves have made them stronger. So, should you be afraid of failure? Of course—you’ll have to swim for your life—but failure might just be the push you need to do greater things in life. Don’t fear it, face it!

Failing is scary, but it isn’t as negative of an experience as we think it to be. You need to fail. So allow yourself to fail, and fail often. Gather whatever courage you have and charge at this daunting monster. Don’t run. Don’t hide. Don’t let failure hold you back. Slay the beast before you and become the warrior you were meant to be.

Original Works

Office | Crush | Fail

My mother always said, “Beware of broken memories.” It was a strange thing to say to a child. And growing up, I assumed the warning came from a place of hurt – my father left when I was twelve, and my brother died at birth. But oddly enough, my mother never uttered those words to my sister. It was for me, only for me, she often insisted.

After my mother’s death, I left the countryside for the city. My hometown was the embodiment of broken memories. But little did I know, moving into the world beyond was where my mother’s words proved true. It started a year after I settled down, on a regular day at the office, when talk of the new manager reached my desk.

“I looked him up – he’s listed in the world’s top ten most eligible bachelors,” Kristen said.

“Someone has a crush… again,” Will stated.

Instead of frowning, as she usually did, Kristen nodded with a grin. “I call dibs. Don’t steal him,” she said to me.

“He’s all yours,” I replied. I wasn’t interested in relationships. After witnessing my mother’s heartbreak, I was sold on embracing my singlehood.

“Aw, I was looking forward to a fight,” Will said.

“Shut it, Will. I have enough competition as it is,” Kristen snapped. “He’s just too… I can’t even… ah…” Kristen clasped her phone at her chest in a moment of daydream.

Shaking his head, Will leaned toward me. “Have you seen this guy?”

“Well, Kristen showed me a picture. He kinda looks like someone I know.”

“Who?” Kristen asked.

“I’m not sure. He just looks… familiar – like I’ve seen him before.”

“Please don’t tell me he’s a movie star,” Will said.

“I don’t know – maybe?”

“He’s a movie star?” Kristen gasped. Without hesitation, she tapped away at her phone.

“Look what you’ve done.” Will sighed.

“Sorry.”

To my relief, our conversation ended shortly after – after Kristen confirmed he wasn’t a movie star. But it was to Will’s dismay, as we were interrupted by the man of the hour. He strode onto our floor in an iron-pressed suit, tailored for his swimmer’s physique. As he greeted everyone with a friendly smile, I could almost hear Kristen’s heart beating out of her chest. Indeed, he was an attractive man. Yet there I was, trying to recall where I’d seen him. And the more I racked my brain, the stronger enmity there was.

“He’s perfect,” Kristen whispered, nudging me for affirmation. Unfortunately, I could only offer a shrug. I couldn’t pretend to adore him, when I had a strange urge to flee. It seemed silly to have such a notion. But, my instincts have saved me before. And I couldn’t ignore its prompt, especially in the presence of – what I concluded as – evil.

That day, after lunch, I began my search for a new job. It was an irrational move – I was well aware of how I looked with my reasoning. But I had to. I just had to. And by the time everyone started departing for home, I had a list of potential companies. Not wanting to waste another day, I stayed back to file my applications. And it was then, my craziness proved my sanity.

“You’ve seen me before, haven’t you,” he said.

I jumped in my seat. There he was, standing across my desk – how did I not hear him? His voice was deep and emotionless. And in fear, I refused to meet his gaze.

“No,” I replied, as I rose to my feet. Hastily, I packed my belongings – ready to retreat.

“Don’t lie. I’m not a fan of liars,” he stated.

“I’m not lying,” I said. Then snatching my bag, I gave a shallow nod and stalked toward the exit.

“I know of you,” he added. He paced alongside my quick steps, but absent were the clicking of his shoes on the wooden floor. “I remember – my memory has yet to fail me.”

“Sorry, but I don’t remember you,” I replied. “Goodnight.”

“Very well. I hope to see your resignation tomorrow,” he said.

I was ten feet away from the elevator, but I halted in my steps. Was that a threat, or did he know? Alike a prey falling for a predator’s trap, I asked, “What?”

“Do you not think that there are things which you cannot understand, and yet which are; that some people see things that others cannot?”

“I don’t…”

His words resonated perturbation. I needed to leave – I wanted to – but instead, I turned to meet his placid mien. And in that moment, I remembered. It wasn’t a complete memory, but I knew where I’d seen him. His words, quoted from a book inspired by his very existence, now etched itself in my memory. And no matter how hard I tried to forget, I knew who he was.

“It’s better to forget,” he said.

“I don’t… d-don’t know what you’re talking about,” I managed to utter.

“Good.” He smiled.

As I stood frozen, he strolled past me and called for the elevator. Upon its arriving ding, he gestured for me to enter. As though I was under a spell, I obediently did as he commanded. And when the doors closed, I didn’t question a thing. I knew, that soon enough, that night would be a broken memory. He would become a figment of doubted history. And as long as I didn’t see him again, I could move forward… safe from a past I cannot remember – safe from a memory that wasn’t even mine.

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Office, crush, and fail were words given by Rico/Pat. I’ve sleep on this set for weeks – wondering how to approach it. And since I didn’t want to write a cliche, as these words naturally suggested, I tried to pull off a twist. I can only hope you didn’t see it coming.

Now, it’s your turn. I challenge you to use this same three words to write a piece of your own. Oh, and since I have no more words – seriously, I’ve used them all up – please send me more! Please leave 3 random words in the comment section below. I’d really appreciate it!

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3 Words, 1 Story © 2017 by Jeyna Grace. All rights reserved.

(Click HERE for a list of stories in this writing challenge.)