Fan Fiction (Shorts)

Goblin Crusher

“The Goblin Crusher has done it again. Witnesses from Gringotts have claimed that Cornelius Fudge, our newly elected minister of magic, has been threatening the Goblins during his daily visits. Not only so, he was said to be seen throwing one over a cliff as a warning to the rest.

How far will Cornelius fudge go just to get his dirty hands on Gringotts? One can’t really tell. All we do know is that our beloved minister has no respect for other magical creatures, as he undermines their value….”

“Bloody rumours. They don’t know what they are writing about,” his assistant said as Cornelius Fudge threw The Quibbler into the fireplace.

“Sir, if-”

“I need some time alone, to think,” Cornelius said as he waved for his assistant to leave. His assistant nodded and left his side immediately.

“Goblin crusher. Couldn’t come up with a better name could they?” Cornelius scoffed.

As he took a seat by the fireplace, the sun was already slowly setting, casting hard shadows in his office. Its weak rays found a spot on the coffee table, where a draft of tomorrow’s Daily Prophet lay.

Its headlines read, ” Minister of Magic denies Goblin rumors” right above a picture of Cornelius Fudge in his best pressed suit.

“Our newly elected Minister of Magic, Cornelius Fudge, denies the claims of his violent acts towards the Goblins at Gringotts Bank.

“The Quibbler, like many other non-commercialized newspapers, is only seeking attention once again. Spreading rumors has always been their forte, and it is our duty not to buy into such rumors, to keep the peace among our people,” says the minister of magic.”

By the time Cornelius had relived the day of which he gave that statement, his office was finally swallowed with darkness. But the flickering light from the dim fireplace failed to hide the satisfaction on his face. Once again, he knew he had done it. He was untouchable, no matter what those who were against him say or do.

But how, how did they manage to get such information of him? That was the question that kept bothering him. He had never failed to be discreet, and just as he was about to brush the thought aside, a memory slipped right onto the tip of his mind.

It had been raining for days, but Cornelius did not find it as an excuse not to pay his little friends a visit. He had been informed that a group of his wildly intelligent friends were gathering by a clearing in the forest, to discuss on how they could black mail him. And so before they could decided, he was going to barge in and offer them a solution.

Together with his trusted assistant, his wand, he stormed into the clearing. Rain pelted on his heated face, and when they saw him, they tried to scatter. But to his delight, they could not escape from his binding spells.

As he rounded their stiff bodies and assembled them in front of him, he asked one simple question, “Who’s in charge?”

But none of them dared to answer as they started breaking into cold sweat.

“Tell me, or I’ll drop him!” Cornelius ordered as he moved a goblin towards the edge of a cliff and hovered him in the air with his wand.

Only shivers and whimpers could be heard from the small crowd of drenched goblins.

“Fine,” Cornelius said as he pulled his wand away and a scream echoed the air.

“Who’s next?!” Cornelius asked.

Just when one of them was about to answer, he heard a crack. It was distinct even under the pouring rain. As he searched among the trees, he spotted a figure, running away from the scene.

His heart stopped briefly before he dashed after it. It was small and fast, but he could not make out what it was. When he finally came out of the forest into the nearby town, he knew he had lost it. He decided not to return to the goblins as leaving them there would teach them a lesson about treachery. But he kept his eye out, just in case he was still being watched.

Drenched coat and soaked hat, Cornelius hurried to a nearby tavern for shelter. Once he had ordered a warm glass of butterbeer, he spotted something rather peculiar.

A few tables away from him was a child, who held a copy of the Daily Prophet upright, but upside down. Dripping on the floor around her were the water from her cloak in which she was still wearing.

As he stood up, certain he had caught the figure who was spying on him, a familiar voiced called out to him.

“Minister! What are you doing here on a rainy day?”

Turning around only to find the annoying Xenophilus Lovegood, Cornelius quickly searched for the child again, but she was gone. The only thing left of her was the puddle of water under her seat.

The puddle of water was painted so clearly in his mind that he knew that child was The Quibbler’s informer. But who was that child? Pale with dirty blond hair. Immediately it struck him, it was Lovegood’s daughter.

“Why, that man would use his own child?!” Cornelius was rather surprise.

But was there really anything to be surprise off? It was time for Cornelius to keep an eye out, especially on the little girl who might have already known too much.

And boy, did he dislike being around children after that. Their sneaky little hands could steal everything he had worked so hard for. Perhaps Cornelius Fudge would deny this, but he possibly feared children more than Dementors.

(Bestsellerteen requested a story on Cornelius Fudge, you can request a story too in the comments below!)

Fan Fiction (Shorts)

The Hero Boy

Ms. Marisa was Roy’s favorite nanny. She only took care of him during the summer as during the rest of the  year, she was away at her school, studying magic.

Roy, being only 9, was already a big fan of magic, and even though he was not allowed a wand of his own, he always used his father’s old wand whenever Ms. Marisa was around.

The only reason why Roy never gave Ms. Marisa a hard time was not because she fed him candy or let him zoom around on his broom inside the house, it was because she loved teaching him magic.

Everything Ms. Marisa learned in school, she would teach him, and today, as Roy pointed his father’s old wand at his pet rabbit, a silver like string came floating out from its head.

“Did it work?” Roy asked as he watched his rabbit hop back to the water bowl and drank from it, which it had already done 30 seconds ago.

“Try it again,” Ms. Marissa said.

“Obliviate!” Roy said, as he gave his wand a slight twist at the rabbit. Once again, the poor rabbit drank from its bowl of water, completely oblivious to the fact that it had already done so early.

“Ob-“

“Wait! We don’t want your rabbit to get all bloated with water!” Ms. Marisa pulled the wand from Roy just in time.

“But, it didnt work!” Roy knew full well that it did. He just wanted to do the spell again.

“It did. And I’m going to teach you another, don’t you wanna learn another?” Ms. Marisa asked, seeing his frown.

A smile immediately crossed his face as he nodded his head vigorously.

“Well, this is a simple summoning spell. All you have to do is concentrate on something, for example that book on the table, and say accio book.” With a small tilt of the wand, the book came flying towards Ms. Marisa, and Roy couldn’t help but gasps in excitement.

“My turn, my turn!” Roy grabbed for his wand and tried. He tried and tried till he had managed to get the book to hover a few centimeters above the table.

“Clever boy!” Ms. Marisa patted him on the back.

Just when Roy was about to attempt at making the book go higher, a crashing sound, which came from downstairs, made both their heads turn to his bedroom door.

“Is your parents home? I don’t remember hearing the fireplace pop,” Ms. Marisa asked, in a tone unlike her usual.

Roy shrugged. He had not heard the fireplace pop either, and it was strange, because his parents always used the floo network from work to home.

“I’m going down to check.”

“No! Don’t leave me! What if it’s a bad wizard?!”

Ms. Marisa, who apparently did not hear him, exited his room and shut the door behind her.

Roy hurried to the door and pressed his right ear against it, trying to hear what was going on, but he heard nothing. Curious, he sneaked out of his room and tip toed down the staircase. It was then that he heard a loud crash followed by a thud that shook the ground beneath him.

“Ms. Marisa?!” Roy shouted.

“It’s o.k Roy. I knocked him out,” Ms. Marisa said proudly, under her shaking voice, as she came out from the kitchen.

“What happened? What did you do?” Roy quickly asked as he peeked into the kitchen doorway, spotting a huge man, sprawled unconscious on the ground.

“I knocked him out with some of your mother’s pots and pans.” Ms. Marisa laughed nervously at the thought.

“With accio spell?” Roy asked keenly.

“Yes. Now go be a dear and flame for the ministry.” Ms. Marisa pointed at the fireplace.

“Wait, what did that man want?”

“He wanted… erm.” Ms. Marisa paused and hesitated before she continued, “You.”

“Why?”

“Wanted gold from your parents Roy. Now you better flame for the ministry while I watch him.”

Roy nodded and headed to the fireplace. He threw some purple powder into the flames and as it turned yellow, Roy peered over and shouted, “Someone tried to kidnap me! You have to come now!”

A female face appeared in the flames and replied, “We’re right on our way Master Lockhart.”

Just then, a crazy idea flashed across his not so innocent mind. Roy reached for the wand he had tucked into his shirt earlier and pointed it at Ms. Marisa.

“What are you doing?” Ms. Marisa asked as she narrowed her eyes at him.

“I’m sorry Ms. Marisa, but I have to do this,” Roy said, as he contemplated his plan.

“Do what?” Ms. Marisa chuckled, thinking Roy was just being playful.

“You’ll help everybody love me more,” Roy tried to explain.

“What are you talking about?” The expression on Ms. Marisa’s face had not change as she shook her head and laughed.

“Obliviate!” Roy shouted, and to his surprise, a silver string slowly floated out of her head. He expected the spell not to work, but it did.

As he happily watched a blank expression wipe across Ms. Marisa’s face, Roy cooked up a whole new story in which everyone, to his deepest satisfaction, believed to be the truth.

Roy was lonely and he wanted people to like him, to love him and to know him. His parents didnt have time for him and now that he was about to make the headlines as a hero who saved his nanny from an intruder, his parents would have to give him all their attention.

Roy was the hero boy, the boy whom every child wanted to be friends with and the boy whom every parent would want as a child. He was going to have it all.

True enough, he made the headlines on the Daily Prophet the next day, “Gilderoy Lockhart, the Hero Boy.” All that at what cost? A nanny who started loving him even more.